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Reports Mandated by HABHRCA 2004

The Prediction and Response Report, renamed the National Assessment of Efforts to Predict and Respond to Harmful Algal Blooms in US Waters, was published in September 2007. It was the first step in a process to create an innovative research plan on prediction and response. The purpose of this report was to detail federal, state, and tribal prediction and response-related research and impact assessments, evaluate prediction and response programs, and highlight needs for prediction and response efforts and associated infrastructure. A summary of this report was published in the Federal Register in September 2006, and the report was available for public comment for 60 days. After the period of public comment, the final Prediction and Response report, which included a summary of the public comments, was approved by the Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology in February 2007. The report received final interagency clearance July 2007 and is now available for downloading. The assessment of current prediction and response programs and identification of needs led to the development of the second report, the National Scientific Research, Development, Demonstration, and Technology Transfer Plan on Reducing Impacts from Harmful Algal Blooms (RDDTT Plan) stipulated by the HABHRCA 2004 legislation. The Prediction and Response Report and the RDDTT Plan together make up the final report, Harmful Algal Bloom Management and Response: Assessment and Plan.


Click here for a copy of the original Prediction and Response Report (If you have trouble downloading the report, click here for instructions.)

To download a one page fact sheet on the original Prediction and Response report, click here

The National Scientific Research, Development, Demonstration, and Technology Transfer Plan on Reducing Impacts from Harmful Algal Blooms (RDDTT Plan) presents a comprehensive and coordinated national research program to develop and demonstrate prevention, control, and mitigation methods to reduce the impacts of HABs on coastal and freshwater ecosystems, public health, and the economy. A community workshop convened forty-nine experts, including HAB scientists, coastal and inland resource and human health managers, communication experts, and social scientists, from June 25-28, 2007 in Woods Hole, MA, to develop a strategy for improving and implementing HAB prediction and response. The findings of the workshop were published in the report, Harmful Algal Bloom Research, Development, Demonstration, and Technology Transfer National Workshop Report, which focuses on priorities for improving critical infrastructure, for developing and implementing prevention, control, and mitigation strategies, and for improving “rapid” event response capabilities. The workshop report was used by the Interagency Working Group on HABs, Hypoxia, and Human Health (IWG-4H) in writing the RDDTT Plan. The RDDTT Plan was added as the last chapter to the Prediction and Response report to make up the final report, Harmful Algal Bloom Management and Response: Assessment and Plan. This combined report was published in September 2008.

For a copy of Harmful Algal Bloom Management and Response: Assessment and Plan, click here (If you have trouble downloading the report, click here for instructions.)

To download a one page fact sheet on the report, click here

The Scientific Assessment of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms provides an assessment of the current knowledge about HABs in freshwater and sets research priorities to work toward reducing impacts of these events. The assessment examines the causes, ecological consequences, and economic costs of freshwater HABs. It is based, in large part, on a workshop report from the interagency-sponsored International Symposium on Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms (ISOC-HAB), held September 2005, which focused on: 1) occurrence of freshwater blooms and toxins, 2) causes, prevention, and mitigation, 3) toxins, toxin kinetics and dynamics, 4) human health and ecological effects, 5) analytical methods for identifying and quantifying freshwater HAB organisms and toxins, and 6) risk and/or impact assessments for freshwater HABs. The Scientific Assessment of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms received final interagency clearance in April 2008 and is now available for downloading.

Click here for a copy of the Scientific Assessment of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms (If you have trouble downloading the report, click here for instructions.)

To download a one page fact sheet on the report, click here

The Scientific Assessment of Marine Harmful Algal Blooms shall examine the causes and ecological consequences of harmful algal blooms. This assessment shall also evaluate progress made by Federal research programs and identify ways to improve coordination and prevent unnecessary duplication of research among Federal agencies. The first assessment shall only consider marine HABs, and future assessments shall include marine and freshwater HABs. The legislation also calls for an assessment of economic costs of HABs and a description of prevention, control and mitigation methods, which are addressed in more detail in the Harmful Algal Bloom Management and Response: Assessment and Plan. The Scientific Assessment of Marine Harmful Algal Blooms summarizes the state of the marine HAB problem, evaluates activities of current federal programs, and describes opportunities for coordination at the national and international level. The assessment draws from the recent HAB national plan, Harmful Algal Research and Response: a National Environmental Science Strategy (HARRNESS) 2005-2015. The assessment was published in December 2008.

Click here for a copy of the Scientific Assessment of Marine Harmful Algal Blooms
(If you have trouble downloading the report, click here for instructions.)

To download a one page fact sheet on the report, click here.

The Scientific Assessment of Hypoxia in U.S. Coastal Waters describes the prevalence, causes, and impacts of hypoxia (or low oxygen) in the United States, the progress made through federal investment in understanding this problem, and research priorities for the future. It provides a comprehensive list of U.S. coastal water bodies impacted by hypoxia and highlights a spectrum of vulnerable ecosystems in eight descriptive case studies (Lake Erie, Long Island Sound, Chesapeake Bay, Pensacola Bay, northern Gulf of Mexico, Yaquina Bay, Oregon/Washington shelf and Hood Canal). Scientists from NOAA, EPA, USGS, USDA and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science co-authored the report.

The assessment was published in August 2010.
Click here for a copy of the Scientific Assessment of Hypoxia in U.S. Coastal Waters
To download a one page fact sheet on the report, click here.

Local and Regional Scientific Assessments of HABs and Hypoxia can be requested of the Secretary of Commerce by State, Indian tribe, and local governments. These assessments shall examine the causes, ecological consequences, and economic costs of these events in specific regions and identify potential methods for prevention, control, and mitigation and provide costs and benefits of such methods. The Secretary of Commerce will coordinate with the Task Force and appropriate State, Indian tribe, and local governments to provide these assessments as requested. There is no required completion date called for these assessments in the legislation.

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